British 20th C, except portraits, Continental European after 1800, East of England and The Midlands: Artists and Subjects, Sculpture 4 Could this be a bronze by the Croatian sculptor Petar Palavicini (1888–1958)?

DBY_BXMAG_TN_2003_A110_001
Topic: Artist

I believe the signature may wrap around the sides of the base (images #7-8) [both attached], and I do not think it is 'P Poute' but the initials are clearly PP. After looking into the matter, I believe this is by Petar (or Petrus) Palavicini (1888-1958), a Croatian sculptor who exhibited in London and Swansea (1930) and Belfast (1931), and this piece could easily be c. 1930. Compare to this piece by him, and note especially the base and the treatment of the feet in both works, as well as the similarity of the figures overall https://bit.ly/3hsHfDe. Here is another work by him with biographical information https://bit.ly/3huroUq. Here is his listing on Mapping Sculpture, which is what pointed me in the right direction based on his initials https://bit.ly/36dXajj.
Could the title really be Byblis, the mythological character who fell in love with her twin brother? https://bit.ly/2SJPFxG. This statuette depicts a very young woman standing nude, wearing what appears to be a small fez cap.

Jacinto Regalado, Entry reviewed by Art UK

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4 comments

The Collection has commented: 'The provenance is the Funduklian collection. Arto Funduklian, son of an Armenian refugee living in Manchester, went to learn the oriental goods market in Paris in the 1920s. While there, he purchased several artworks, mostly prints and engravings by contemporary artists. He moved to New York (where he died), leaving his collection with his brother Vahe who remained in Manchester in the textile industry. Vahe collected a few more pieces by contemporary artists before retiring to Buxton with the third brother Naz. The collection was bequeathed in 1980. The documentation includes three sculptures including Babylisse (written as this) but no artist ascribed. I assume that the then curator identified the artist and I've no idea of the source. The suggestion that this is Palavicini is appealing, but is it not too few letters before the v on the signature?’

Jacinto Regalado,

Based on the attached enlarged view of image #8, I now think it may not be part of the signature but rather a reference to this piece being 1/5 or 1/6, referring to the number of versions made.

Jacinto Regalado,

I suppose the title might conceivably be an Armenian name or word, but I am not at all familiar with that language.

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