Continental European before 1800, Scotland: Artists and Subjects 16 Do you recognise the artist's monogram on this painting of fruit?

Fruit on a Salver on a Marble Ledge
Topic: Artist

This painting is signed in monogram, bottom right. Can anyone suggest who 'D. C. G.' might be? The collection has no further information on the artist.

Edward Stone, Entry reviewed by Art UK

16 comments

Roderick Macleod,

No ideas. Other than it, or something similar ('Still life of fruit on silver tray' by 'monogrammist DCG') was auctioned at Stockholms Auktionsverk, Stockholm on 28/4/1987, which might be a clue to provenance (but probably isn't).

Sophie Grillet,

From Wikipedia
Diana Glauber (11 January 1650, Utrecht – c. 1721, Hamburg), was a Dutch Golden Age painter.
According to Houbraken, she was the daughter of the Amsterdam chemist Johann Rudolph Glauber, and the sister of the painters Jan Gotlief and Johannes Glauber.[1] She was good with portraits and historical allegories, but lost her sight and stopped painting.[1] She was still living in Hamburg while Houbraken was writing.[1]

According to the RKD no works are known,[2]

Peter Nahum,

Please let me see a decent image of the initials - many thanks

Osmund Bullock,

Peter, a higher-res image may be forthcoming in due course, but meanwhile I've cropped and manipulated the slightly larger Art UK one to make it a bit clearer (I think). Attached.

1 attachment
Edward Stone,

We have relayed this request to the collection and will post a higher-resolution detail of the monogram if we are given permission to do so.

Robin Campbell,

While something may come from these local discussions, surely RKD should be consulted, or its retired guru Fred G Meijer?

Edward Stone,

This discussion is now linked to the Continental European before 1800 group.

Barbara Bryant,

Good idea, Jacinto. These do indeed look similar. George Gray (1758-1819) was the son of the Scottish bookbinder and friend of Allen Ramsey, Gilbert Gray. The artist was based in Newcastle and specialised in fruit pieces. More information in the ODNB and here https://www.british-history.ac.uk/no-series/newcastle-historical-account/pp575-590
He did, however, usually sign his name in some form or other, not via a monogram, at least it is not known that he did so.

Martin Hopkinson,

several other still lives by Gray are in collections covered by artuk.org in proposals for discussions , which have not yet been taken up such as Maidstone's Peaches and Grapes,

Over a matter of some years I have identified directly other paintings by him by writing directly to the museums owning them

The Hunterian Art Gallery has a signed and dated 1811 painted by him which was presented in 1811 by a member of the Hedley family , Thomas Hedley. This was one of the first paintings to arrive in the Hunterian's collection after the museum and gallery opened to the public. It had been exhibited at the RA earlier that year

Martin Hopkinson,

I think that the painting under discussion may be by another artist. I have never seen a signature in monogram like this on his work
The silver tray makes me think that the artist was Dutch or Flemish

Marcie Doran,

It is an old discussion but I am hoping that I can help to close it.

This might be by the Dutch artist Barend van der Meer (1659–1702). There are two works by him on Art UK (at Nottingham City Museums and Galleries) (https://tinyurl.com/4tfzh37w): “Fruit Piece with Dragonfly” (1692) and “Fruit Piece with Wine Glass” (1692). They are both “oil on canvas”, unlike this work that is “oil on paper”.

I think that it is not signed “D.C.G.” but “DCC”, one of the Cs being reversed. And, I think that “DCC” is not a monogram but the date in Roman numerals. DCC would be “700” - for the year 1700.

After capturing the images of the three works on my iPad, when I flipped through them I had a difficult time identifying the mystery work because they all looked so similar.

I have attached a composite that compares the marble table of this mystery painting to the one in “Fruit Piece with Dragonfly” (https://tinyurl.com/nbk5xtn8). I think the table is very similar. The note states that the marble table is the same one that appears in “Fruit Piece with Dragonfly” (but it should state that it is the same table as in “Fruit Piece with Wine Glass” (https://tinyurl.com/uxbhsd7y)). The redcurrants in the smaller mystery work are nearly identical to the cherries in the larger work (and, similar redcurrants are shown in “Fruit Piece with Wine Glass”).

The note also states: “A witty addition is the cherry stone on a stalk that is shown at the corner of the table on the right.” In the mystery work, there is a similar ‘witty addition’ located in the same section of the work - one of the raspberries near the right edge of the platter has been stripped of its small fruits, leaving only the receptacle.

Is it possible to find out where the signature of Barend van der Meer was placed on the two works in Nottingham?

Osmund Bullock,

One of the Nottingham van der Meers (https://bit.ly/3zPesAt) has a signature bottom left that is none too clear at this resolution, but looks similar to the cursive one found by Jacinto on Dorotheum. A tweaked detail attached.

I think the date idea is a bit far-fetched, not least because it's hard to escape the conclusion that the right-hand letter is a 'G'. An enlarged & tweaked version of that detail also attached.

Howard Jones,

Could the monogram be read as C G D instead of D C G? The D is clearly the dominant initial, so does it represent the first name or the last?

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