GL_GM_846
Topic: Artist

It should be possible to identify this artist. The painting is signed and dated lower left. The cropped photograph on Art UK obscures the monogram, but another is attached.

The collection comments: ‘The full image can be found in Peter Humfrey's extensive catalogue “Glasgow Museums: The Italian Paintings”, London, 2012, p. 313 (for quick reference an iPhone snapshot is attached). The signature is a monogram in the form of entwined initials which could be read as RP or PR or perhaps RR. Below it stands “Roma.1875”. Unfortunately, to this date the painter's name has not been identified. Even if the picture was painted in Rome, it is also not certain that the artist was Roman, or even Italian.’

Martin Hopkinson, Entry reviewed by Art UK

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21 comments

Kieran Owens,

It would appear that this monogram is made up of the secondary letters of two opposing letters C, one in normal state and the other its mirror image, and a main letter of A or perhaps a lambda. The artist's initials could, thus, be CCA or CCL.

As a wild alternative, the painting might be by a Russian painter based in Europe at the time that Teacher was collecting his Continental works, in which case the initials could be CCΛ or, phonetically, SSL. If this wild suggestion has some credibility, then perhaps the city name of Roma is in fact a Russian city's or place's name. See the attached example of written cyrillic for lettering comparison.

Also, is the collection certain that the final numeral of the date of 1875 is actually 5?

Attached is a small description Adam Teacher's 1898 bequest. Perhaps Glasgow Museums Resource Centre can identify the name of a possible Russian painter from Glasgow Corporation's original records of this gift.

The assessed value of Teacher's estate following his death was £479,932. In order to arrive at the sum, might an inventory of his paintings have been attached to his will?

Kieran Owens,

In 1903, the Corporation of Glasgow, Museums and Art Galleries, produced 'A Catalogue of the Teacher Bequest of Pictures', a 24-page item printed by Robert Anderson of 142 West Nile Street, Glasgow. Surely this work must be listed therein. If so, could Glasgow Museums Resource Centre check to see if 'Engaged' is a listed title? Perhaps they could also provide a PDF of the whole booklet for examination.

Kieran Owens,

It would also appear that F. Duane Godman of London published a catalogue of the “ Teacher Bequest of Pictures.” on 1901.

Martin Hopkinson,

the National Art Library has copies of the 1901 and 1903 printed catalogues of The Teacher Collection

Kieran Owens,

The Glasgow Herald, of Monday 4th July 1898, printed a full list of the 177 paintings bequeathed to Glasgow Corporation by Adam Teacher. The list identifies the work as being entitled 'Engaged', and as painted by 'R.P.' in 'Roma'. It might well be that at the time the monogram was mis-read. Attached is the newspaper extract.

A word search of the sixth volume (O - R) of Graves' Dictionary of Contributors to the Royal Academy of Arts' exhibitions returns no result for a work entitled 'Engaged'. A similar search of the Royal Scottish Academy's list of exhibited works equally returns no result for a work thus entitled and additionally no artist's name appears that shares an R. and a P. as the initials of a christian name and surname.

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Kieran Owens,

Regarding the Scottish Academy, no artist's name appears either that shares a P. and an R. as the initials of a christian name and surname.

Martin Hopkinson,

It might be worth looking at early Grosvenor Gallery catalogues

Martin Hopkinson,

It might be worth looking at early Grosvenor Gallery catalogues

Kieran Owens,

Marion, here's that question again....might there be any labels etc on the back of this painting that might help in revealing its identity?

Kieran Owens,

Apologies to all for a slip of the fingers on the keyboard....177 above should read 117.

Paul Nicholls,

"Roma" rather than "Rome" might suggest the artist is Italian, but the number "7" is not crossed, as is usual in Italy and elsewhere on the continent, so I think this is probably a non-European artist who has adopted the Italian name for the city .
The monogram might be P.P., with the first letter reversed, or even G.P. - it is not clear.
In my opinion, stylistically this is not by an Italian. It would need to be by an Italian with English connections, someone like Giulio Aristide Sartorio, but that interpretation unfortunately does not fit the case.

Jacinto Regalado,

I would suggest Charles Edward Perugini, but his pictures tended to have a higher or smoother finish. Still, it would be interesting to know what monogram he used, for comparison.

Martin Hopkinson,

None of the exhibits at the Grosvenor Gallery seem to fit UNLESS this is a portrait

Kieran Owens,

Can anyone identify the plant in this painting? It prominence might suggest some significance.

Osmund Bullock,

Possibly an olive or an oleander - there's not enough showing to be sure.

Kieran Owens,

The following link, to an article on the Russian artistic colony in Rome in the latter half of the 19th century, might serve to at least warrant the consideration that this discussion's painting is by a Russian artist with the cyrillic monogram CCΛ (phonetically, SSL).

https://bit.ly/2Te9s2F



Jessica Edwards,

It has a similar style to some paintings by Sir John Everett Millais, like a moment caught on canvas as if it were a photo. I'm not suggesting that's who the artist is, the monogram isn't quite right to begin with, but maybe someone copying his style.

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